Yarn Bomb

Favorite South Congress boutique taps Austin artist for holiday installation

Favorite SoCo boutique taps Austin artist for holiday installation

ByGeorge South Congress Magda Sayeg yarn bomb Christmas 2016
The installation will remain for the month of December. Photo by Morgan Katz
ByGeorge South Congress Magda Sayeg yarn bomb Christmas 2016
Austin-based artist Magda Sayeg yarn-bombed By George's South Congress location. Photo by Morgan Katz
ByGeorge South Congress Magda Sayeg yarn bomb Christmas 2016
The candy cane-colored ropes are reminiscent of stockings hanging from a fire. Photo courtesy of ByGeorge
ByGeorge South Congress Magda Sayeg yarn bomb Christmas 2016
ByGeorge South Congress Magda Sayeg yarn bomb Christmas 2016
ByGeorge South Congress Magda Sayeg yarn bomb Christmas 2016

A yarn bomb has gone off on South Congress Avenue. Just in time for the holidays, Austin-based artist Magda Sayeg has crafted a unique candy cane-colored art installation for By George's South Congress location.

Sayeg defines the craft as "taking knitting material to the street, graffiti-style." She is credited with creating the art form 10 years ago when she wrapped her shop's door handle to add a warm, human quality to the store. While her work can be seen around the world, the "mother of yarn bombing" is always excited to create art in her own city.

Sayeg and By George wanted to display an out-of-the-ordinary decoration that reflects what we love most about the holidays. The "chaotic beauty" of her piece, which went up Thanksgiving weekend, consists of red and white yarn ropes draped down the store's facade, reminiscent of stockings hanging from a mantle. Sayeg describes it as "the scarf By George will be wearing for the month of December."

Sayeg's usual yarn bombing method entails wrapping an object in yarn, but she approached the By George installation a little differently. The artist was inspired by her similar, well-received installation at the Zhejiang Museum during a visit to Hangzhou, China, earlier this year.

Sayeg believes this scarf-like technique perfectly represents Christmas. "It's going to feel lovable and bring up the happy feelings of the holiday season," says Sayeg.