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Kinky Loses Again

Runoff elections turn Texas to the right — and Kinky says goodbye (again)

News_Texas Sen. Dan Patrick
Dan Patrick won the GOP nomination for lieutenant governor.
News_Kinky Friedman
Perennial candidate Kinky Friedman lost again.

Texas took a hard right in the runoff elections on May 27, with Tea Party candidates winning some key races. And perennial candidate Kinky Friedman lost again.

In the biggest state race, radio talk show host Dan Patrick won the GOP nomination for lieutenant governor, unseating three-term incumbent David Dewhurst after a brutally personal campaign. Patrick thanked the Tea Party during his victory speech. "If you love America, the Constitution, Texas, free markets, the Second Amendment and the liberty that comes from God, welcome to the grassroots of the Republican party," he said.

Patrick will face off in November against Leticia Van de Putte, the Democratic lieutenant governor nominee.

State senator Ken Paxton won the nomination for Texas attorney general, defeating the more moderate state representative Dan Branch in what was a nasty contest, with Paxton drawing support from religious conservatives and Tea Party Republicans. In a speech, Paxton flogged the federal government and the Affordable Care Act, and vowed to fight for gun and religious rights.

​In the most notable U.S. House race, Congressman Ralph Hall was defeated after 18 terms in office. At 91, Hall, a veteran of World War II, was America's oldest Congress member and a supporter of Obamacare. He was defeated by John Ratcliffe, a former U.S. attorney who spent more than half a million dollars of his own money by raising questions about whether Hall was too old.

Ratcliffe, who takes office in November because there is no Democrat nominee, called President Barack Obama and his "liberal allies" in Washington "our real nemesis."

In the race for Democratic candidate for U.S. Senator, David Alameel of Dallas overwhelmingly defeated Kesha Rogers, described as a "Lyndon LaRouche Democrat" who called for the impeachment of President Obama. Alameel, who made a fortune on a chain of dental clinics, spent nearly $5 million on the race, most of it his own money.

He will face Republican Sen. John Cornyn, who is favored to win his third term in November.

Kinky Friedman, who has run for office in Texas a number of times, lost his bid for Texas agricultural commissioner, with Jim Hogan easily winning the Democratic nomination. Friedman, who made his candidacy into a referendum on the legalization of marijuana, was viewed as a spoiler. Hogan, a Cleburne-area cattle rancher and insurance salesman, spent little on his campaign against Friedman; he'll now run against Republican Sid Miller.

For other elections in Texas, the Texas Tribune has the results to all of the races across the state.

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