Scooter News

New Lime app lets Austin riders tattle on bad scooter parking jobs

New Lime app lets Austin riders tattle on bad scooter parking jobs

Lime scooter
Nothing more fun than ratting out other people's bad parking jobs. Photo by Lime

In an effort to encourage proper parking, bike-share and scooter company Lime has launched an app where users can rate others' crappy parking jobs. In a game app called "Parked or Not," users see random photos and can anonymously vote on whether the Lime Scooter has been parked correctly.

The bank of photos comes from users, who snap pics of their parking jobs when they end their trip. The app will not only help Lime identify users who park scooters incorrectly, it'll encourage riders to take an active role in educating fellow users on how to park properly.

"Think of it as a fun and engaging way to keep your community clean and educate fellow riders on proper parking habits," says spokesperson Byran Yang in a release. "By crowdsourcing parking rating, Lime can quickly analyze available data to determine if a scooter is parked correctly and further encourage and enforce compliance."

Lime recently released stats from its first year of business in the dock-free scooter and bike-sharing world, including the fact that they've surpassed six million rides since their launch in Greensboro, North Carolina, in June 2017.

Lime's One Year Report pulls back the curtain on the rapidly growing world of dock-free electric scooter and bike rentals. Using anonymized data gleaned from rider surveys, they came up with status on average trip distance, preferred vehicle usage, cost, socioeconomic status, transit connectivity, trip purpose, and destination.

Here's some highlights:

  • 27 percent of riders using Lime connect to or from public transit. The average distance is 1.06 miles.
  • 20 percent of riders in major urban markets used Lime to travel to or from a restaurant or shopping destination.
  • 39 percent or riders in major urban markets used Lime to travel to or from work, school, or appointments.
  • 51 percent of riders in major urban markets reported a total household income of under $75,000.

The company's greatest number of riders are in Seattle and San Diego, both cities where they've hit more than 1 million rides.