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Obesity epidemic's new felon: 8-Hour Diet blames breakfast for bigger waistlines

Obesity epidemic's new felon: 8-Hour Diet blames breakfast for bigger waistlines

8-hour diet book
In the book The 8-Hour Diet, authors David Zinczenko and Peter Moore of Men's Health claim that it's best to cut down ingesting consumables to between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. only.

The arrival of the new year ushers pledges of self-improvement, better health habits and, of course, ambitious weight loss goals. Fad diets that promise dropping pounds by consuming only protein, smoking cigarettes, ingesting tapeworms, eating baby food, over chewing, screwing and using the Bible as a food guide are as unstable as the intellect of Donald Trump.

We can add one more to this ridiculist: Skip breakfast for a thinner, healthier you.

In the book The 8-Hour Diet, authors David Zinczenko and Peter Moore of Men's Health claim that it's best to cut down ingesting consumables to between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. only, or 8 hours per day. They blame technology — that would be light bulbs and electricity — for extending people's active time, which usually includes eating and drinking, socializing, working, you know, living.

 Those folks are looking at a civilization overrun by pissed off, hungry, cranky denizens who can't concentrate and instead fall asleep and binge eat. 

America's obesity epidemic can now be blamed on Thomas Edison. And to think it was about eating more calories than the body burns? Well, that's just imbecilic, jejune science.

"The whole breakfast, you have to have it thing, has been over hyped," Moore said in an interview. His wisdom rebuts what almost every other health advocate and program — with the exemption of certain fasts and new age cleanses — that advise otherwise.

While many disagree with the book's tenets, particularly as they take aim at demoting the importance of the first meal of the day, there's one redeeming lesson to be gleaned from not eating into the evening. Entering slumber without a full stomach is a good thing.

It's important to note that according to the rules of The 8-Hour Diet, there's nothing wrong with breaking the fast at 9 a.m. Though by that hour, most have punched in that timecard, and some don't have the option of eating while on the clock. Those folks are looking at a civilization overrun by pissed off, hungry, cranky denizens who can't concentrate and instead fall asleep and binge eat. Hello eating disorders.

Here's simple advice that won't cost you $26.99: Don't eat more calories than your body burns, strive for nutrient-rich, minimally-processed whole foods and avoid sugar, fat and refined carbs. Oh, and exercise. You have to do something.

You're welcome.