TreeHouse Branches Out

Austin-based Home Depot for hipsters branches out for second location

Austin-based Home Depot for hipsters branches out for second location

Clay tiles from TreeHouse
Fireclay tiles from TreeHouse. Photo courtesy of TreeHouse
TreeHouse Austin paint center
The paint section at TreeHouse in Austin. Photo courtesy of TreeHouse
Treehouse Austin store interior
The store's "idea center." Photo courtesy of TreeHouse
Treehouse Austin store interior
Some have dubbed this the "hipster Home Depot." Photo courtesy of TreeHouse
Clay tiles from TreeHouse
TreeHouse Austin paint center
Treehouse Austin store interior
Treehouse Austin store interior

It’s been called the “Whole Foods of home improvement” and “Home Depot with a green conscience,” and soon Dallas will have one. TreeHouse, a sustainable home improvement store, is opening its first location outside of Austin.

Slated for an early 2017 opening, the TreeHouse will anchor the new Hill Shopping Center, at 75 and Walnut Hill Lane

But back to the store. Known for its focus on eco-friendly solutions to home decor and design, TreeHouse specializes in things such as rainwater harvesting and solar panels. It will be the first retailer for Tesla’s highly anticipated Powerwall home battery, and it is one of the best-performing locations for Nest smart-home products.

“TreeHouse was born in Texas, and it is going to grow up in Texas,” says TreeHouse CEO and co-founder Jason Ballard in the release. “Dallas was an easy choice for the next location. The Dallas community has been supporting us for four years, and now it’s our turn to give back.”

World-renowned (and San Antonio-based) Lake|Flato Architects is designing the Dallas TreeHouse, so expect it to look like anything but a big-box store.

“Many people have said to us ‘Sure, TreeHouse works in Austin, but what about other places?’” Ballard says. “We look forward to showing that quality, beauty, health, a good earth, and good homes are universal values.”

TreeHouse first opened in 2011 on South Lamar in Austin, selling an assortment of products that promoted healthy and sustainable spaces, with an eye toward design. Now it's a full-service, home-improvement store, offering “everything tied to thoughtful building.”

In August 2015, the company closed a $16 million funding round to help, in part, with expansion. Its biggest investor is Container Store co-founder Garrett Boone, who, according to Inc., likes to say to Ballard, “If TreeHouse doesn’t end up working, there is no truth in the universe.”