Hidden Austin 2012
Hidden Austin

Artful graffiti: A photo journey through Austin's most vibrant street art


austin photo set: justin graffiti
Photo by: Steven Kyle Anderson
austin photo set: justin graffiti
Photo by: Steven Kyle Anderson
austin photo set: justin graffiti
Photo by: Steven Kyle Anderson
austin photo set: justin graffiti
Photo by: Steven Kyle Anderson
austin photo set: justin graffiti
Photo by: Steven Kyle Anderson
austin photo set: justin graffiti
Photo by: Steven Kyle Anderson
austin photo set: justin graffiti
Photo by: Steven Kyle Anderson
austin photo set: justin graffiti
austin photo set: justin graffiti
Photo by: Steven Kyle Anderson
austin photo set: justin graffiti
Photo by: Steven Kyle Anderson
austin photo set: justin graffiti
Photo by: Steven Kyle Anderson

Austin is home to dozens of public graffiti galleries, hidden in plain view on industrial buildings, along alleyways and in nooks and crannies all over the city. We've rounded up some of the best examples of the craft to help show off the free artwork our city has on display all the time.

Here, a feathered friend painted in rich detail on the walls of Austin Metal & Iron, south of the train tracks between 4th and 5th streets just east of I-35.

This montage of classic record covers decorates a high stoop behind the El Lago tortilla factory, part of a expansive mural south of 5th Street between Chicon and Comal.

An icon of Austin street art, this piece has remained on the far-west side of the rear wall of the El Lago factory for years and years, surviving many repaintings of the rest of the mural space.

A striking wildstyle burner sprayed across a rear door to the El Lago factory, viewable from the patios outside Tamale House East and the Yellowjacket Social Club.

 

More detail of the massive mural on the south side of 5th Street.

A beautifully detailed piece at a three-story graffiti hotspot cut into Castle Hill at 11th and Baylor. Known historically as the Foundation, the space exists as a canvas for established and aspiring writers alike.

 

The now-named HOPE Local to Global Outdoor Gallery Project, a tri-level, multi-surface space pasted over the abandoned groundwork for a cancelled condo tower, offers a rare contrast of vegetated greenspace and urban decay as atmosphere to the painted work.

Although threatened with closure about a year ago, the outdoor gallery space just west of Lamar lives on. An old set of Shepard Fairey paste-ups, one of the first few pieces to go up on these walls, have themselves become a canvas for local artists.

Small stenciled pieces like these decorate numerous walls and curbs around town.

School is almost out, according to the clock in this colorful piece that covers a full wall at the HOPE Outdoor Gallery.

This namepiece for the No Bounds Krew, luminaries of the Austin graffiti scene, adorns a low wall below the old East Side Drive In, across San Marcos Street from Progress Coffee and the Rogue Equipment athletic shop.