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Blanton Museum of Art presents "Day Jobs" closing day

Blanton Museum of Art presents "Day Jobs" closing day

Photo courtesy of Violette Blue

"Day Jobs," the first major exhibition to examine the overlooked impact of day jobs on the visual arts, is dedicated to demystifying artistic production and upending the stubborn myth of the artist sequestered in their studio, waiting for inspiration to strike. The exhibition will make clear that much of what has determined the course of modern and contemporary art history are unexpected moments spurred by pragmatic choices rather than dramatic epiphanies. Conceived as a corrective to the field of art history, the exhibition also encourages us to more openly acknowledge the precarious and generative ways that economic and creative pursuits are intertwined.

The exhibition will feature work produced in the United States after World War II by artists who have been employed in a host of part- and full-time roles: dishwasher, furniture maker, graphic designer, hairstylist, ICU nurse, lawyer, and nanny - and in several cases, as employees of large companies such as Condé Nast, Ford Motors, H-E-B Grocery, and IKEA. The exhibition will include approximately 75 works in a broad range of media by emerging and established artists such as Emma Amos, Genesis Belanger, Larry Bell, Mark Bradford, Lenka Clayton, Jeffrey Gibson, Ramiro Gomez (now Jay Lynn Gomez), Tishan Hsu, VLM (Virginia Lee Montgomery), Ragen Moss, Howardena Pindell, Chuck Ramirez, Robert Ryman, and Fred Wilson, among many others.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue featuring artist essays commissioned for the book, as well as a podcast, giving artists agency in telling their stories about the compelling intersections between their day jobs and creative practices.

(Photo: Violette Bule, Dream America, 2015. Collection of the artist)

Photo courtesy of Violette Bule

Blanton Museum of Art presents "Day Jobs" opening day

Blanton Museum of Art presents "Day Jobs" opening day

"Day Jobs," the first major exhibition to examine the overlooked impact of day jobs on the visual arts, is dedicated to demystifying artistic production and upending the stubborn myth of the artist sequestered in their studio, waiting for inspiration to strike. The exhibition will make clear that much of what has determined the course of modern and contemporary art history are unexpected moments spurred by pragmatic choices rather than dramatic epiphanies. Conceived as a corrective to the field of art history, the exhibition also encourages us to more openly acknowledge the precarious and generative ways that economic and creative pursuits are intertwined.

The exhibition will feature work produced in the United States after World War II by artists who have been employed in a host of part- and full-time roles: dishwasher, furniture maker, graphic designer, hairstylist, ICU nurse, lawyer, and nanny - and in several cases, as employees of large companies such as Condé Nast, Ford Motors, H-E-B Grocery, and IKEA. The exhibition will include approximately 75 works in a broad range of media by emerging and established artists such as Emma Amos, Genesis Belanger, Larry Bell, Mark Bradford, Lenka Clayton, Jeffrey Gibson, Ramiro Gomez (now Jay Lynn Gomez), Tishan Hsu, VLM (Virginia Lee Montgomery), Ragen Moss, Howardena Pindell, Chuck Ramirez, Robert Ryman, and Fred Wilson, among many others.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue featuring artist essays commissioned for the book, as well as a podcast, giving artists agency in telling their stories about the compelling intersections between their day jobs and creative practices.

The exhibit will be on display until July 23, 2023.

(Photo: Violette Bule, Dream America, 2015. Collection of the artist)

Photo courtesy of Wally Workman Gallery

Wally Workman Gallery presents Diana Greenberg opening reception

Wally Workman Gallery will open their eighth solo show with abstract painter Diana Greenberg. The work in this show is most influenced by Havana, Cuba. Specifically, Havana Viejo's (Old Havana’s) architecture and color.

Greenberg is struck by the juxtaposition of the color and specifically the boldness of the color families within one building, or a series of neighboring buildings. Of Cuban heritage, Greenberg is intrinsically inspired to explore the visual sense of living there.

While working on the small oil and mixed media works for this show, Greenberg was also influenced by Ikebana, or Japanese flower arranging. She loves the sculptural quality of the arrangements in Ikebana and wanted to create portraits of their forms. She continues with the Heron series, which mimics the concentric lines embroidered on a kimono.

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on display until March 26.

Image courtesy of Juan Villegas

ArtUs Co presents "Dream State" closing reception

ArtUs Co will presents the closing reception of their current exhibition, "Dream State," a peek into consciousness. The exhibition features works of art that evoke mystery, expansion, oneness, and paint a world where anything is possible.

Guests can enjoy drinks from Oskar Blue Brewery, mingle with the artists, and delight in the beautiful, dreamy works.

Photo by Salihah Saadiq

Antone's presents Salihah Saadiq - "Homecoming: Tenfold"

Antone's Nightclub will present "Homecoming: Tenfold," featuring never-before-seen photos from the past year by their house photographer, Salihah Saadiq.

The event is about celebrating life (and Saadiq's 26th birthday), community, music, and all the abundance brought along the way. The exhibition includes photos of artists such as Sue Foley, BLK Odyssy, Booker T., and more.

DJs Ashmar and Bambi will be spinning tunes, and there will also be event merch available, and a chance to win some local goodies and a print from the show in a raffle.

Photo by Maria Frati

PrintAustin presents "The Contemporary Print" opening reception

The Contemporary Print, PrintAustin's annual juried exhibition, presents fresh perspectives in printmaking by artists who push the boundaries of traditional techniques and showcase innovative approaches in contemporary printmaking. The exhibition features the work of artists from across the United States, Canada, South Korea, and the United Kingdom.

Presented in collaboration with Austin Community College, The Contemporary Print 2023 is juried by Rashaun Rucker, an artist who makes photographs, prints, and drawings and has won more than 40 national and state awards for his work.

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The "world's rudest" diner is coming to Austin, plus more top stories

Hot Headlines

Editor’s note: It’s that time again — time to check in with our top stories. Here are five articles that captured our collective attention over the past seven days.

1. A diner with the "world's rudest service" is coming to Austin...like, whenever. Karen’s Diner provides the worst service for the best experience, at least according to cheeky clientele who appreciate the campy comedy of a long-suffering server.

2. Award-winning New York pub brings Irish hospitality to Austin's Sixth Street. The Dead Rabbit pub is bringing Ireland to Texas, opening a new location in downtown Austin.

3. Where to see the once-in-recorded-history green comet approaching Austin. The comet will be closest to Earth (thus, likely the most visible) on February 1, and its most recent appearance was 50,000 years ago.

4. 6 Austin restaurants score coveted James Beard Award nominations. Austin restaurants and bars earned both national and regional recognition, with three national nominations and three nominations for Best Chef: Texas.

5. 2 Austin suburbs cash in among the richest places in Texas for 2023. Lakeway has been renamed the fifth richest place in Texas for 2023 in a recent study, while Bee Cave moved from No. 13 in 2022 to No. 9 this year.

Austin's flagship Kendra Scott store transforms into mini-Museum of Ice Cream for Valentine's Day

Sweet On You

Roses are red, violets are blue, and it's almost February, which means the season of love is upon us. Whether you're looking for the perfect Instagram backdrop or the perfect gift for your Galentine, Valentine — or just a treat for yourself — one particularly sweet collaboration has you covered.

Starting February 1, Austin's own Kendra Scott is partnering with the Museum of Ice Cream to "spread joy, inspire human connection, and reimagine the way we experience ice cream and jewelry just in time for Valentine’s Day," according to a release.

An extension of Scott's “Sweet on You” Valentine’s Day campaign, the partnership will feature an immersive, experiential retail component in the bustling Kendra Scott flagship location on South Congress, as well as a custom ice cream flavor, opportunities to give back, and more.

For an immersive retail experience, the event space at the flagship store will be transformed into a mini-Museum of Ice Cream appropriately dressed with bananas, baubles, and hearts galore. If you've never made it to the renowned museum housed at the Domain, this is your chance to get a literal taste of the experience, while shopping for trinkets and treasures at the same time.

Both companies prioritize giving back as key pillars of their brand, so it's only fitting that the duo will be surprising three schools in Austin, Chicago, and New York with February ice cream parties as part of their partnership. Children at participating schools will be able to enjoy the exclusive Kendra Scott x Museum of Ice Cream flavor while crafting their own Museum of Ice Cream cardboard truck. Each classroom will also receive an Amazon gift card to offset teaching supplies, and Kendra Scott will provide each student with a yellow rose to give alongside Valentine’s messages for their friends, family, teacher, or crush.

Taking place from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm, a public event on Febuary 1 will formally celebrate the launch of the partnership. Guests will be able to check out the collaborative, immersive shopping experience while shopping Kendra Scott’s new Valentine's Day Collection, enjoying free ice cream and treats from the Museum of Ice Cream and the Sips & Sweets Café.

RSVP to the public event here, and start shopping the Valentine's Day collection here.

Texas-based Cinemark theater chain hosts Oscars-themed movie marathon

Awards News

The Cinemark movie chain is giving movie buffs an opportunity to brush up on the Oscars.

Plano-based Cinemark Holdings, Inc. will host its annual Oscar Movie Week festival, this year running from Monday, March 6 through Sunday, March 12, in anticipation of the 95th Oscars ceremony, which airs on March 12 on ABC.

The theater chain will air all of this year’s Best Picture and Best Live Action and Animated Short Film nominees, at more than 120 participating Cinemark theaters nationwide.

According to a release, passes are now on sale now at Cinemark.com/movieweek.

A full Digital Festival Pass is $40 and includes showings for all Best Picture and Best Live Action and Animated Short Film nominees. There's a perk! If you purchase a festival pass, you get 50 percent off any size popcorn during Oscar Movie Week.

Individual showtime tickets will be available starting January 27 at standard pricing, with showtimes beginning March 6.

All Best Live Action and Animated Short Film nominees are bundled into one viewing for just $10 from March 10-12.

For other brushing up, take a look back at what CultureMap’s film critic, Alex Bentley, had to say about each of the nominees (listed in alphabetical order) when they were originally released.

Cinemark has been hosting other similar marathon events such its collaboration with ESPN to bring college football games to the big screen.

The event takes place at these theaters across the U.S., including the following locations in Texas:

  • Austin: Cinemark Southpark Meadows
  • Denton: Cinemark 14
  • Fort Worth: Ridgmar Mall
  • Grapevine: Cinemark Tinseltown
  • Houston: Cinemark Memorial City
  • Plano: Cinemark Legacy
  • Plano: Cinemark West Plano
  • San Antonio: Cinemark San Antonio 16
  • The Woodlands: Cinemark 17