Homes Tour Sneak Peek

Exclusive look at the beautiful houses from the upcoming 2014 AIA Austin Homes Tour


AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 A Parallel Architechture
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 A Parallel Architechture
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 A Parallel Architechture
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Brian Dillard Architecture
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Brian Dillard Architecture
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Brian Dillard Architecture
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Dick Clark + Associates
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Dick Clark + Associates
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 FAB Architecture
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 FAB Architecture
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 FAB Architecture
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Forge Craft Architecture + Design
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Forge Craft Architecture + Design
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Forge Craft Architecture + Design
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Jay Corter, AIA and Jay Hargrave, AIA
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Jay Corter, AIA and Jay Hargrave, AIA
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Jay Corter, AIA and Jay Hargrave, AIA
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Mell Lawrence Architects
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Mell Lawrence Architects
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Michael Hsu Office of Architecture
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Michael Hsu Office of Architecture
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Stuart Sampley Architect
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Stuart Sampley Architect
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Stuart Sampley Architect
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Stuart Sampley Architect
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Webber + Studio Architects
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Webber + Studio Architects
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Webber + Studio Architects
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Sprecht Harpman
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Sprecht Harpman
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography
AIA Austin Homes Tour 2014 Sprecht Harpman
Photo by Andrea Calo Photography

This month, AIA Austin is holding its 28th annual AIA Austin Homes Tour on October 25-26. For nearly three decades, the self-guided tour has celebrated the diverse and stunning design talent of local architects while showcasing some of the best designed homes in the Austin area.

The 2014 Homes Tour will feature 11 homes ranging from dramatic mid-century modern renovations, energy-efficient and budget-minded designs, to stunning waterfront properties and new constructions of modern dwellings — all which shape the look and feel of Austin.

The event typically draws a crowd of more than 5,000 attendees to explore the fresh concepts on display in the tour, discover new ideas for their own home projects and experience some of the best architecture Austin has to offer. Tours are open from 10 am to 6 pm on both Saturday and Sunday.

Tickets are $35 in advance, $40 the weekend of the tour. Advance tickets may be purchased at Zinger Hardware (4001 N. Lamar), Mockingbird Domestics (2151 S. Lamar), or directly from AIA Austin website. Tickets to an individual home will be available for $10 each and can be purchased at the individual home on the day of the tour.

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Because this home is sitting on a steep hillside, the building actually occupies 4 split levels, allowing for garage access in the front, yard access in the back, a hidden storage level and rooftop access with downtown views.

By A Parallel Architecture.

By A Parallel Architecture.

By A Parallel Architecture.

This is a small, functional house with no wasted space. Features from the original 1940s home were maintained so it fits into its surroundings, but the addition to the space is modern and include a windowed gallery and recessed porches.

While the two sections of the home are different, they fit seamlessly together and incorporate both the past and the present.

By Brian Dillard Architecture.

By Brian Dillard Architecture.

By Brian Dillard Architecture.

Originally built in 1958, this home backs up to the Bright Leaf Nature Preserve. The house was situated to overlook the preserve, but was originally very dark and closed in. The remodel did not change the home’s footprint, but instead rearranged the elements to make it more usable, and to open it up to the surrounding environment.

Although virtually every element of the home was updated, the original lines and character of the house remain.

By Dick Clark + Associates.

By Dick Clark + Associates.

The clients for this project previously worked with FAB on an extensive remodel for their past home in the French Place neighborhood. While visiting a home in the AGAVE neighborhood, they fell in love with another home, noting the use of light and livability of the space. A few months passed and they were faced with an “out of the blue” offer on their French Place property and they decided to sell and build a new house.

Recalling the house in AGAVE, they did some research to find out who designed it, and low and behold it was their friends at FAB Architecture.

With some tweaking and personalization to the 2005 design, FAB was able to capture the needs of the client and fit the home within the fabric of its East Austin neighborhood.

By FAB Architecture

By FAB Architecture.

By FAB Architecture.

This house will be four-star rated by Austin Energy Green Building (AEGB). It makes use of as many energy efficient features as is affordable and solar panels allow the house to run at approximate net zero.

Other energy-efficient features include a VRF (variable refrigerant flow) mechanical system, a heat pump water heater, a reflective cool roof, LED lighting and insulated slab exterior insulation on the roof and walls.

By Forge Craft Architecture + Design.

By Forge Craft Architecture + Design.

By Forge Craft Architecture + Design.

The design-build effort on this home extends out to the front yard’s board-form concrete wall complete with metal gates, as well as a zip-lined tree house in the backyard.

By Jay Corder, AIA, and Jay Hargrave, AIA.

By Jay Corder, AIA, and Jay Hargrave, AIA.

By Jay Corder, AIA, and Jay Hargrave, AIA.

This home is composed of three stone boxes. The clean design and simple palette creates an space for clients who desire a tranquil, elegant home with the sensibilities of an art museum.

Incorporating craftsmanship in the details, this is a space that must be experienced in person.

By Mell Lawrence Architects.

By Mell Lawrence Architects.

This small home perched on a steeply sloping "postage stamp lot" overlooking Lady Bird Lake was designed for a painter and collector.

The home features a restrained exterior with dynamic and active interior spaces. Initially, the site was said to be unable to hold a complete home, but the owner found it to be perfect for her needs.

By Michael Hsu Office of Architecture.

By Michael Hsu Office of Architecture.

This home has achieved AEGB program’s highest rating for a single-family residence.

By Stuart Sampley Architecture.

 By Stuart Sampley Architecture.

 By Stuart Sampley Architecture.

 By Stuart Sampley Architecture.

It can be difficult to remodel mid-century modern homes. Adding a seamless addition can be tricky because of the low, flat, iconic style. But this addition makes the home better than the original.

The off-center, vertical piece is a reinterpreted A-frame that includes two bedrooms with a loft space and stairs that lead up to a rooftop deck.

By Webber + Studio Architects.

By Webber + Studio Architects.

By Webber + Studio Architects.

This home is an extensive renovation and addition to an existing 1970s house. The original structure was much lower and was entered via a long, steep, dangerous ramp that ran down from the road level to the first floor 25 feet below.

The renovation expanded and changed the appearance of the house completely. The new space also includes the addition of a new entry pavilion at the roof, which allows for a gracious entry — and for the roof to be used as a vegetable garden and entertainment space with dramatic views of Lake Austin.

By Specht Harpman Architecture.

By Specht Harpman Architecture.

By Specht Harpman Architecture.

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