Photo courtesy of Amy Scofield

Amy Scofield has no shortage of materials at her disposal. She uses our detritus to create intuitively inspired works of magic. Starting first with the material, she sits with it, plays with it, moves, contorts and struggles with it. It is not necessarily an easy process, or fun, in her words. This is not the pleasure part of art for her. But driven she is to create. And we the viewers  are the lucky recipients.

Scofield has more than one kind of artistic drive though. Her artistic pleasure often comes out of her strolls or bike rides, listening to her inner guidance as  to what route she takes. Go left down this alley. Stop here. Look down. Look over your shoulder. Pick up this stick. She is keenly listening and  obeys. It may end with having gotten a bit of exercise. It may end with a photograph of a shadow. It may begin in the alley and end in a field lighting  matches.

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on view through June 25.

Amy Scofield has no shortage of materials at her disposal. She uses our detritus to create intuitively inspired works of magic. Starting first with the material, she sits with it, plays with it, moves, contorts and struggles with it. It is not necessarily an easy process, or fun, in her words. This is not the pleasure part of art for her. But driven she is to create. And we the viewers are the lucky recipients.

Scofield has more than one kind of artistic drive though. Her artistic pleasure often comes out of her strolls or bike rides, listening to her inner guidance as to what route she takes. Go left down this alley. Stop here. Look down. Look over your shoulder. Pick up this stick. She is keenly listening and obeys. It may end with having gotten a bit of exercise. It may end with a photograph of a shadow. It may begin in the alley and end in a field lighting matches.

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on view through June 25.

Amy Scofield has no shortage of materials at her disposal. She uses our detritus to create intuitively inspired works of magic. Starting first with the material, she sits with it, plays with it, moves, contorts and struggles with it. It is not necessarily an easy process, or fun, in her words. This is not the pleasure part of art for her. But driven she is to create. And we the viewers are the lucky recipients.

Scofield has more than one kind of artistic drive though. Her artistic pleasure often comes out of her strolls or bike rides, listening to her inner guidance as to what route she takes. Go left down this alley. Stop here. Look down. Look over your shoulder. Pick up this stick. She is keenly listening and obeys. It may end with having gotten a bit of exercise. It may end with a photograph of a shadow. It may begin in the alley and end in a field lighting matches.

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on view through June 25.

WHEN

WHERE

Lydia Street Gallery
1200 E. 11th St.
Suite 109
Austin, TX 78702
https://www.lydiastreetgallery.com/new-page-88

TICKET INFO

Admission is free.
All events are subject to change due to weather or other concerns. Please check with the venue or organization to ensure an event is taking place as scheduled.