Quantcast
eventdetail
Photo courtesy of Benné Rockett

Benné Rockett's current body of work, "Repairing Nature," utilizes Japanese traditions for imbuing worn and broken objects with a second season. The loosely interpreted techniques of kintsugi and sashiko highlight the salvageability of all things.

Equally evocative are the materials. A pair of small sculptural dresses are made from tarlatan, a material used by printmakers to wipe excess ink off plates. Plant DNA barcodes are carved into surfaces while gold eye pins pierce surfaces to draw a genome sequence. Fruits, vegetables, and garden detritus are encased in beeswax. All of these materials are used to document the layers of being alive.

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on display until September 15.

Benné Rockett's current body of work, "Repairing Nature," utilizes Japanese traditions for imbuing worn and broken objects with a second season. The loosely interpreted techniques of kintsugi and sashiko highlight the salvageability of all things.

Equally evocative are the materials. A pair of small sculptural dresses are made from tarlatan, a material used by printmakers to wipe excess ink off plates. Plant DNA barcodes are carved into surfaces while gold eye pins pierce surfaces to draw a genome sequence. Fruits, vegetables, and garden detritus are encased in beeswax. All of these materials are used to document the layers of being alive.

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on display until September 15.

Benné Rockett's current body of work, "Repairing Nature," utilizes Japanese traditions for imbuing worn and broken objects with a second season. The loosely interpreted techniques of kintsugi and sashiko highlight the salvageability of all things.

Equally evocative are the materials. A pair of small sculptural dresses are made from tarlatan, a material used by printmakers to wipe excess ink off plates. Plant DNA barcodes are carved into surfaces while gold eye pins pierce surfaces to draw a genome sequence. Fruits, vegetables, and garden detritus are encased in beeswax. All of these materials are used to document the layers of being alive.

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on display until September 15.

WHEN

WHERE

Lydia Street Gallery
1200 E. 11th St.
Suite 109
Austin, TX 78702
https://www.lydiastreetgallery.com/show/lydia-street-gallery-benne-rockettrepairing-nature

TICKET INFO

Admission is free.
All events are subject to change due to weather or other concerns. Please check with the venue or organization to ensure an event is taking place as scheduled.