Photo courtesy of Women & Their Work

Jenelle Esparza is interested in the landscape, the interconnected identities tied to it, and the stories it can tell us. She studies the ancestry and identity of a people through landmasses and other organic forms as they relate to culture and community, with a focus on the untold and lesser-known histories of a place and what was left behind.

Esparza utilizes cotton as a root source material and inspiration. At least three generations of her family have picked cotton in Texas, which connects her to other Latino families who share the same history and also to the larger story of cotton in America. Her work explores the personal and cultural impact of cotton, including the effects of hard labor on the body and the resiliency and resourcefulness it instills.

In "It Could Only Be Lived," Esparza employs a variety of techniques and processes to give voice to the landscapes and landmarks of South Texas. In the seemingly mundane and commonplace rocks, hills, trees, soil, and brush are hidden characters, holders, and receivers. Inspired by a grouping of family heirlooms and farming tools from her grandmother’s garage, she pairs cotton fiber with old cast iron tools and hardware that are repurposed into representations of cultivation and survival, of place, memory, and family. In the works are stories of struggle, strife, and tenderness, translated through the distinct language of the land that is a living witness to an overlooked history.

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on display until December 15.

Jenelle Esparza is interested in the landscape, the interconnected identities tied to it, and the stories it can tell us. She studies the ancestry and identity of a people through landmasses and other organic forms as they relate to culture and community, with a focus on the untold and lesser-known histories of a place and what was left behind.

Esparza utilizes cotton as a root source material and inspiration. At least three generations of her family have picked cotton in Texas, which connects her to other Latino families who share the same history and also to the larger story of cotton in America. Her work explores the personal and cultural impact of cotton, including the effects of hard labor on the body and the resiliency and resourcefulness it instills.

In "It Could Only Be Lived," Esparza employs a variety of techniques and processes to give voice to the landscapes and landmarks of South Texas. In the seemingly mundane and commonplace rocks, hills, trees, soil, and brush are hidden characters, holders, and receivers. Inspired by a grouping of family heirlooms and farming tools from her grandmother’s garage, she pairs cotton fiber with old cast iron tools and hardware that are repurposed into representations of cultivation and survival, of place, memory, and family. In the works are stories of struggle, strife, and tenderness, translated through the distinct language of the land that is a living witness to an overlooked history.

Following the opening reception, the exhibit will be on display until December 15.

WHEN

WHERE

Women & Their Work
1311 E Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX 78702, USA
https://womenandtheirwork.org/upcoming/jenelle-esparza/

TICKET INFO

Admission is free.

All events are subject to change due to weather or other concerns. Please check with the venue or organization to ensure an event is taking place as scheduled.