High anxiety

Texans among the most stressed-out people in America, says new study

Texans among the most stressed-out people in America, says new study

Stressed out woman, mom, working from home
Work and family are top causes of stress for Texans. Getty Images

No wonder nearly 40 percent of Texans have packed on the pounds during the coronavirus pandemic. It turns out Texas ranks as the 10th most stressed-out state in the country.

A new study by personal finance website WalletHub indicates Texas’ sixth-place ranking for work-related stress and its seventh-place ranking for family-related stress contribute heavily to the state’s No. 10 position on the stress-o-meter. Texas shows up at No. 11 for health- and safety-related stress, and No. 30 for money-related stress.

Experts say a high level of work-related stress, as is the case in Texas, can be connected to weight fluctuations. In a survey by the FitRated website for fitness equipment reviews, one-fourth of full-time workers reported changing their eating habits due to work-related stress.

“If you’re stressed at work, you might … notice a shift in your appetite. For some people, stress-related eating can reflect a loss of appetite or the craving for comfort food,” according to the Weatherford-based American Institute of Stress.

WalletHub looked at 41 indicators of stress for the study, including average hours worked per week, personal bankruptcy rate, and share of adults getting adequate sleep. Texas shows up at No. 4 for both the most average hours worked per week and the lowest credit scores. Here’s how Texas fares in other parts of the study, with a No. 1 rank signaling the most stress:

  • No. 8 for share of adults in fair or poor health
  • No. 13 for share of population living in poverty
  • No. 14 for crime rate per capita
  • No. 19 for psychologists per capita
  • No. 25 for divorce rate
  • No. 28 for job security
  • No. 30 for housing affordability

Nevada tops WalletHub’s list of the most stressed-out states; South Dakota sits at the opposite end of the stress spectrum.